Life-extension drugs

+44 (808) 189 0019
Life-extension drugs
Can not find medication you need on our site? Let us know and we'll supply you any drug you wish!

Seroquel Review Article

 

Seroquel is one of the largest trade names for the drug Quetiapine. It is an antipsychotic that is widely used for the treatment of mental disorders such as schizophrenia, manic, mixed or depressive bipolar disorders. Some clinical trials also prove it to be positive in cases of deep depression. Some physicians will also recommend Seroquel as a treatment for Tourette’s syndrome and alcoholism but this is neither indicated nor contraindicated by the FDA. For those who have insomnia and anxiety they may also be recommended to use a low dose of Seroquel.

Dosage Packing Price Add to basket
100 mg 60 tab, brand version, manuf. by AstraZeneca USD 137.00 Add to Basket
200 mg 60 tab USD 265.00 Add to Basket

Seroquel generic (generic - what is it?)

Dosage Packing Price Add to basket
25 mg 100 tab USD 45.00 Add to Basket
100 mg 100 tab USD 57.00 Add to Basket
200 mg 100 tab USD 109.00 Add to Basket

Weird, crazy, psychotic, delusional, mad
SEROQUEL (Quetiapine): The “Atypical” Drug for Psychosis

Psychosis


Weird, crazy, psychotic, delusional, mad, these are just some of the terms used to describe a person suffering from psychosis. Admit it or not, we tend to stay away from patients with psychosis because we are afraid. This fear comes from little or no understanding of the condition of these patients. This attitude will eventually create a stigma for them which consequently create fear in the rest of us who are afraid of being stigmatized themselves.

When an individual starts to show symptoms of psychosis, he or she tries to disregard the possibility of really having psychosis, and believes that some other condition could be held responsible. But psychosis should not be feared. Though it is incurable, this mental illness can be corrected with the adequate treatment. Patients with psychosis can have normal lives.

Let us first define psychosis. Psychosis is a mental state defined as loss of contact with the reality (Pubmed Health). Symptoms are divided in two classes: the positive or the excess symptoms which include disorganized thought and speech, delusions, and hallucinations, and the negative or the “loss of functioning” symptoms which include lack of motivation and/or interest, loss of emotions or ideas.

Psychosis is usually caused by psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, but may also be caused by medical conditions such as dementia, brain tumors, and degenerative brain diseases. Research suggests that abnormal dopamine activity is the cause of psychosis (Davis, Ko and Davidson, 1991). This was proven by Laruelle and Abi-Dargham (1999) using a positron emission tomography (PET) of a living human brain which was induced with psychosis. The PET images showed abnormal dopaminergic activity. Thus, the basis for treatment of psychosis would be drugs that have an effect on dopamine levels.


Typical versus Atypical Antipsychotic Agents: Which to Use?

Antipsychotic drugs are sedative psychiatric drugs that are the first line of treatment for psychosis. These drugs act by creating a blockade of the dopamine receptors, thus reducing psychotic symptoms. Antipsychotic drugs are separated in two classes - the first generation or the traditional antipsychotic agents and the second generation or the atypical antipsychotic agents.

Traditional antipsychotic agents were first used in the early 1950s. They addressed the positive symptoms of psychosis but not the negative ones. These drugs produced extra pyramidal symptoms (EPS) as side effects. EPS are repetitive, involuntary movements which include dyskinesia, akathisia, or dystonia. They are sometimes said to be worse than the symptoms of the disease itself.

atypical antipsychotics
Two decades later, i.e. in the 1970s, the atypical antipsychotics were introduced on the market. These drugs have two advantages: they resolve both positive and negative symptoms and they do not produce EPS. Many studies show that atypical antipsychotics are preferred by patients. In a study performed by Dolder et al., it was observed the patient adherence to traditional versus atypical antipsychotics. The results showed that patients adhere more to atypical antipsychotics as more patients were returning to their pharmacies to get a refill. The results indicated that patients would prefer a drug that has a better side effect profile and would resolve several symptoms. Another study performed by Karow, Schnedler and Naber (2006) showed that patients preferred atypical antipsychotics because of better symptom treatment and also because they were better tolerated by their bodies than the traditional antipsychotics.

Which Antipsychotics Are Recommended?

Among the several atypical antipsychotic agents, quetiapine or Seroquel® stands currently as the only atypical antipsychotic approved to treat the different mood episodes of bipolar disorder and the only licensed treatment for bipolar depression in Europe.

SEROQUEL®, or quetiapine fumarate, is an atypical antipsychotic drug belonging to the derivatives of dibenzothiazepine. It is a white to off-white crystalline powder. Its molecular formula is C42H50N6O4S2•C4H4O4 and its structural formula is:


The chemical structure of Quetiapine Fumarate, Seroquel
Quetiapine Fumarate, Seroquel. It is approved
for the treatment of psychotic disorders
such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder


Seroquel® has showed mild side effects, it also has a long term action and, according to studies, it is superior to other atypical agents. Let us discuss the action mechanism of Seroquel®.

Seroquel’s action is due to the blockade of the Dopamine-2 (D2) receptors in terminal regions. This produces an initial increase in the activity of dopaminergic neurons as a response to the blockade. This first reaction is followed by a gradual decrease in their activity, and finally by a total stop of activity. This operating flow explains why the drug has a typical slow action. Serial PET scans show that quetiapine dissociates from D2 receptors very quickly which allows dopamine to induce normal effects in other areas such as the nigrostriatal and the tubero-infundibular pathways. This rapid dissociation is the reason for the minimal side-effects of the drug. As for the long term effect, the active metabolite of quetiapine, norquetiapine, possesses most of the pharmacological effects of quetiapine. Thus, the metabolite produces the same dopamine blockade, and consequently the longer action.

Seroquel® has been extensively studied and has been proven to be superior to traditional antipsychotics, and to other atypical antipsychotics. The following studies show the advantages of quetiapine over other antipsychotics.
Seroquel vs Haloperidol

In a study performed by Purdon et al. (2001) Quetiapine was compared to Haloperidol, a traditional antipsychotic agent. Although there was a similar beneficial effect on the sample patients, there was better tolerability as well as less adverse effects experienced with Quetiapine treatment than with haloperidol treatment. There was also recorded a higher drop out in patients using haloperidol. This study proves that, overall, patients preferred atypical agents.

Seroquel vs Other Atypical Agents

A study conducted by Johnsen et al. aimed at determining the effectiveness of four atypical agents – Quetiapine, Olanzapine, Risperidone and Ziprasidone. Generally, the results showed that the effects of Quetiapine were superior to those of the other drugs. It was also found that Quetiapine is a good starting drug for patients showing symptoms of psychosis.

Seroquel and Other Indications

Seroquel® was studied furthermore to look for other possible indications. Tassniyom et al. (2007) found that Quetiapine administration on patients with primary insomnia showed an overall improvement although it was not considered to be statistically significant. One of Quetiapine’s side effects is somnolence or drowsiness which is due to its antihistamine blockade. This is the basis for the study on its use as a treatment for insomnia. Unfortunately, further studies are still needed to prove its effectiveness in treating the above mentioned condition.

Another side effect of Quetiapine is increased appetite. This may be the basis for the pilot study performed by Court et al. (2010) in which Quetiapine showed overall improvement in the condition of patients with Anorexia Nervosa. The group concluded that Quetiapine is a promising candidate for treating this particular disorder.

Dosage Forms

As of 2007 Seroquel® has been available as an extended release tablet. The tablet is to be taken once every day as compared to the 150 mg immediate release that is taken twice or even three times daily. So which one is better? The study of Figueroa et al. (2008) compared the pharmacokinetic profiles of the two drugs, and found that there is no significant difference among the two of them. Therefore, if there is no perceived difference in their effect, then a “once a day” medication would be more convenient to patients and adherence would be higher since the patient would only have to remember taking the drug once.

Contraindications and Safety of Use

The US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) reports the possible risk of death for geriatric patients with dementia, and possible risk of suicidal thoughts or actions in depressed individuals. Before taking Seroquel®, consult your physician about other health conditions as well as other drugs being taken as Seroquel® has some dangerous interactions which need to be checked.

Conclusion

Psychosis is a mental health condition which is characterized by a loss of contact with reality. It has no cure but symptoms can be treated with antipsychotic agents. The drugs are subdivided in two categories: atypical and traditional antipsychotic agents. The presented studies proved that atypical antipsychotic agents are more efficient due to their reduced side effects which make them more tolerable against traditional antipsychotics. They also cover both positive and negative symptoms. Seroquel, an atypical antipsychotic agent, has been proven to have advantages over traditional agents and over other atypical agents. Moreover, Seroquel was also studied for other possible indications.

Written by: Richard S. Binos.


REFERENCES
• COURT, A., et.al. 2010. Investigating the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of quetiapine in the treatment of anorexia nervosa in young people: A pilot study. Retrieved from http://www.druglib.com/abstract/co/court-a_j-psychiatr-res_20100504.html
• DAVIS, K.L., KAHN, R.S., KO, G., & DAVIDSON, M. 1991. Dopamine in schizophrenia: a review and reconceptualization. Retrieved from http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/148/11/1474
• DOLDER, C.R., et.al. 2002. Antipsychotic medication adherence: is there a diffrence between typical and atypical agents? Retrieved from http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/159/1/103
• FIGUEROA, C., BRECHER, M., HAMER-MAANSSON J.E. & WINTER, H. 2008. Pharmacokinetic profiles of extended release quetiapine fumarate compared with quetiapine immediate release. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278584608003011.
• JOHNSEN, E., KROKEN, R.A., WENTZEL-LARSEN, T., & JORGENSEN H. 2010. Effectiveness of second-generation antipsychotics: a naturalistic, randomized comparison of olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone. Retrieved from http://www.druglib.com/abstract/jo/johnsen-e_bmc-psychiatry_20100324.html
• KAROW, A., SCHNEDLER, D. & NABER, D. 2006. What Would The Patient Choose? Subjective Comparison of Atypical and Typical Neuroleptics. Retrieved from https://www.thieme-connect.com/ejournals/abstract/pharmaco/doi/10.1055/s-2006-931541
• LARUELLE, M. & ABI-DARGHAM, A. 1999. Dopamine as the wind of psychotic fire: new evidence from brain imaging studies. Retrieved from http://jop.sagepub.com/content/13/4/358.short
• MELTZER, H.Y. 2002. Mechanism of action of atypical antipsychotic drugs [online]. Neuropsychopharmacology: The Fifth Generation of Progress. Retrieved from: www.acnp.org/asset.axd?id=75bd7ebd-a920-4b2a-a8cd-98f203068765
• MIDLAND THERAPEUTIC REVIEW AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE. Summary Sheet Quetiapine (Seroquel): An atypical antipychotic for the treatment of schizophrenia. Retrieved from thttp://195.62.199.219/pctsla/mtrac/ProductInfo/summaries/Q/QUETIAPINE%202.pdf
• PURDON, S.E., MALLA, A., LABELLE, A. & LIT, W. 2010. Nueropsychological change ing patients with schizophrenia after treatment woth quetiapine or haloperidol. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1407745/
• PUBMED HEALTH. Psychosis. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002520/
• RXLIST INC. 2011. Seroquel [online]. Retrieved from: http://www.rxlist.com/seroquel-drug.htm
• TASSNIYOM, et.al. 2007. Quetiapine for Primary Insomnia Patients : A Randomized Controlled Trial. Retrieved from http://www.druglib.com/trial/22/NCT00328822.html


 

My BasketMy Basket

Schizophrenia, Psychosis
Seroquel
Seroquel Review Article


Buy here


Seroquel prescribing information


Newsletter subscription


Product search

Product list

- ACARBOSE
- ACCUPRIL
- ACIPHEX
- ACTOS
- ACYCLOVIR
- ADALAT
- ADAMANTAN
- AERIUS
- ALENDRONATE
- ALLEGRA
- ALLOPURINOL
- AMANTADINE
- AMARYL
- AMINOGUANIDINE
- AMITRIPTYLINE
- ARAVA
- AREDIA
- ARICEPT
- ARIMIDEX
- ASTRAGALOSIDE IV
- ATORVASTATIN
- AUGMENTIN
- AVAPRO
- AVASTIN
- AVEMAR IMMUNE BOOSTER
- AZARGA
- AZOPT
- B-VITAMIN COMPLEX
- B-VITAMIN COMPLEX FORTE
- B6 VITAMIN
- BENICAR
- BONIVA
- BROMOCRIPTINE
- BURDOCK ROOT OIL
- CAFFEINE COMPLEX
- CALCITRIO
- CAMPTO
- CASODEX
- CAVINTON
- CENTROPHENOXINE
- CIALIS
- CIPROBAY
- CLIMAGEST
- CLOMID
- CLOTRIMAZOLE, BIFONAZOLE
- COAXIL
- COENZYME Q10
- COMBIVIR
- COMPETACT
- COMTAN
- COVEREX
- COVERSYL
- COZAAR
- CRESTOR
- CYCLOASTRAGENOL (TA-65 ACTIVE SUBSTANCE)
- CYMBALTA
- D3 VITAMIN
- DEPAKOTE
- DEPO-MEDROL
- DEPRENYL
- DIABENOL
- DIFLUCAN
- DOXYCYCLINE
- E VITAMIN
- ECHINACEA/ VIT. C 1000/ ZINC
- EFFEXOR
- ELDEPRYL
- EULEXIN
- EVISTA
- EXELON
- FARESTON
- FAT BURNER
- FEMARA
- FISH OIL
- FLOMAX
- FLUCONAZOLE
- FOLIC ACID
- FOSAMAX
- GALVUS
- GLEEVEC, GLIVEC
- GLUCOBAY
- GLUCOBENE
- GLUCONORM
- GLUCOPHAGE, GLUCOPHAGE XR
- IBUPROFEN
- IMATINIB
- IMIGRAN
- IMUNOVIR
- INULIN
- IODIDE (KI)
- IODINE WATER
- IRESSA
- ISOPRINOSINE
- JANUMET
- JANUVIA
- JUMEX
- K-2 VITAMIN
- KALETRA
- LAMISIL
- LESCOL
- LEUZEA ROOT
- LEVAQUIN, LEVOFLOXACIN
- LIFE EXTENDING KIT
- LIPITOR
- LIPOIC ACID
- LOTENSIN
- MACA VIBE
- MADOPAR
- MEGACE
- MELATONIN
- MEMANTINE
- METFORMIN
- METOPROLOL
- MILGAMMA
- MIRAPEXIN
- MOBIC
- MOVALIS
- MUMIJO (MUMIO)
- NADH
- NEUPRO
- NEXIUM
- NIZORAL
- NOLVADEX
- NOOTROPIL
- NOOTROPYL
- NORVASC
- ORUNGAL
- OSELTAMIVIR
- PANTOCRIN
- PIKAMILON (PICAMILON)
- PIRACETAM
- PLAVIX
- PRECOSE
- PROSCAR
- PUMPKINSEED OIL
- RALOXIFENE
- RAPAMYCIN
- RED WINE HIGH IN RESVERATROL
- RESVERATROL
- REVALID CAPSULES
- REVALID CREAM
- REVALID HAIR TONIC
- REVALID SHAMPOO AND CONDITIONER
- REYATAZ
- RHODIOLA ROOT
- RHODIOLA TABLETS
- ROSUVASTATIN
- RUTIN
- SCHISANDRA
- SEA-BUCKTHORN
- SELEGILIN
- SELENIUM
- SEROQUEL
- SINEMET
- SINGULAIR
- SPORANOX
- STABLON
- SUSTIVA
- TAMIFLU
- TAMOXIFEN (ZITAZONIUM)
- TASMAR
- TELFAST
- THIOGAMMA (LIPOIC ACID)
- TOLCAPONE
- TOPAMAX
- TRITICO
- TRUVADA
- VALDOXAN
- VEPESID
- VFEND (VORICONAZOLE)
- VIAGRA
- VINPOCETINE
- VINPOTROPILE
- VIREAD
- XALATAN
- XELODA
- XENICAL
- XYLOMETAZOLINE / OTRIVIN
- ZETIA
- ZIAGEN
- ZINC (ZN)
- ZITHROMAX
- ZOCOR
- ZOFRAN
- ZOVIRAX
- ZYPREXA
- ZYRTEC

You are located on a secure website.
Customer data is for our internal use only and will be treated as confidential.

eXTReMe Tracker